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How-To

PanPastel Colors are a quick and easy way to add color and weathering effects to your models, for example:




• general wear & tear
• scorch marks
• battle damage
• exhaust marks
• oil streaks
• shading
• dust
• soot
 

PanPastel offers a quick and easy alternative to popular weathering techniques:

• Sanding & filing pastel sticks to create powders can be a messy and slow process, however now, with PanPastel Colors the modeler can instantly apply pastel color to get realistic weathering effects straight from the pan.

• Compared to airbrushing PanPastel is quicker, simpler and much more forgiving, as PanPastel color can be removed or changed until the desired results are achieved (prior to fixing with a flat finish).

 


 

Basic Instructions

Read Model Railroader Magazine's article by Tony Koester "Weather a locomotive in 7 minutes - really!" Download the instruction sheet to learn the basics of railroad weathering technique.
1. Select a Sofft Tool, for example a Sofft Knife with matching Cover or Sofft Sponge Bar.
2. Load Sofft Tool with color by swiping gently over pan color surface 1-3 times. Do not dig into the color.
Work the entire surface of the pan evenly.

Tip: swiping more than 1-3 times will generate unnecessary excess dust and waste.


Cleaning

The same Sofft Tool can be used with multiple colors - “clean” between colors by wiping on a dry paper towel.

Important! Keep pan surface dry at all times - do not apply wet tools or fluids directly to the pan.



If a pan’s surface becomes contaminated when mixing colors – “clean” by gently wiping pan with a clean sponge or paper towel.


Erasing Colors

If you make a mistake PanPastel Colors can be removed from many surfaces, by using an eraser or rubbing off.


Fixing & Sealing

If the model will be handle frequently, you can “lock in” the color, by spraying with a flat finish e.g. Dullcote.

Tip: it is better to spray in light layers, and build up as desired for the best effect and to prevent color loss, rather than drenching the color with a lot flat finish.